Publications & Reports

The influence region of origin, area of residence prior to migration, religion, and perceived discrimination on acculturation strategies among sub-Saharan African migrants in Australia.

Renzaho AMN, Mansouri F, Counted V, Polonsky M

Abstract

The study examined whether there was an influence of region of origin, area, or residence prior to migration, religion, and perceived discrimination on the acculturation strategies of sub-Saharan African migrants in Australia. These factors have been found to affect acculturation, given the multi-dimensionality of identify formation. Data were obtained on 425 sub-Saharan African migrants and refugees living in Victoria and South Australia. Acculturation was measured using the Vancouver Acculturation Index. Compared to migrants from central Africa, those from eastern Africa (adjusted odds ratio [AOR], 0.45; p < 0.01) were less likely to assimilate, while migrants who lived in large towns or the city prior to migration (AOR, 0.54; p < 0.05) were less likely to separate but more likely to assimilate (AOR, 2.26; p < 0.01) than those who came from refugee camps. Compared to Muslims, Christians (AOR, 0.57; p < 0.05) were less likely to integrate while those practising religions other than Islam or Christianity (AOR, 3.54; p < 0.01) were more likely to separate. Migrants reporting not fitting in/excluded were less likely to be in the culturally marginalised group (OR, 0.86; p < 0.01) but more likely to report being integrated (AOR, 1.14; p < 0.01), whereas those reporting personal discrimination (AOR, 1.12; p < 0.01) and societal discrimination (AOR, 1.13; p < 0.01) were more likely to separate or remain traditional. In order to promote cultural pluralism and facilitate cultural adaptations among sub-Saharan African migrants, educational programs, anti-racism policy, and legislative reforms need to reposition multiculturalism in a way that promotes tolerance and acceptance of ethnic, cultural, and religious diversity.

Link to publisher’s web site

Publication

  • Journal: Journal of International Migration and Integration
  • Published: 01/03/2022
  • Volume: 23
  • Pagination: 141-160