Publications & Reports

Ending AIDS in Johannesburg: An analysis of the status and scale-up towards HIV treatment and prevention targets. (Technical Report)

Burnet Institute (including Robyn Stuart, Cliff Kerr, Andrew Shattock, David Wilson) Optima Consortium for Decision Science, supported by the World Bank for the Gauteng Province Department of Health and South African Department of Health

Abstract

The South African Government has committed to the globally promoted 90-90-90 scale-up targets and shares the vision of Ending AIDS by 2030 (Sustainable Development Goal time horizon, 95-95-95 targets). In 2012, it was estimated that in South Africa, two-thirds of new HIV infections occur in urban areas (over 300,000), and that the incidence rate in informal urban settlements was at 2.5% compared to 1.1% nationally.1 The Gauteng cities of Johannesburg, Ekurhuleni and Tshwane, and the KwaZulu-Natal metro of eThekwini, are the health districts (metros) driving the national HIV statistics. The Johannesburg Health District alone is thought to have 22% of all people living with HIV (PLHIV) in any of the eight metros.2,3 Johannesburg District has a population of approximately 4.8 million and relatively annual population growth of about 3%.

Cities and metropolitan areas offer both scope and opportunities to take the country closer to the 90-90-90 targets due to the concentration of population and HIV burden. South Africa’s eight metros only cover 2% of the national territory but account for 39% of the country’s population. They are responsible for 70% of the Gross Domestic Product, and contain half of all unemployed South Africans.5 The metros are vital areas for HIV and health interventions to succeed due to their economic importance for national prosperity.

Publication

  • Journal: Technical Report for the World Bank for the Gauteng Province Department of Health and South African Department of Health
  • Published: 01/07/2016

Author

Health Issue