Publications & Reports

Injecting risk behaviours following treatment for hepatitis C virus infection among people who inject drugs: The Australian Trial in Acute Hepatitis C.

Alavi M, Spelman T, Matthews GV, Haber PS, Day C, van Beek I, Walsh N, Yeung B, Bruneau J, Petoumenos K, Dolan K, Kaldor JM, Dore GJ, Hellard M, Grebely J; ATAHC Study Group
The Kirby Institute, UNSW Australia, Sydney, Australia. Electronic address: msalehialavi@kirby.unsw.edu.au.

Abstract

BACKGROUND: A barrier to hepatitis C virus (HCV) treatment among people who inject drugs (PWID) has been a concern that interferon-based HCV treatment may increase injecting risk behaviours. This study evaluated recent (past month) injecting risk behaviours during follow-up among PWID that did and did not receive HCV treatment. METHODS: The Australian Trial in Acute Hepatitis C (ATAHC) was a prospective study of natural history and treatment of recent HCV infection. Analyses were performed using generalized estimating equations. RESULTS: Among 124 participants with a history of injecting drug use (median age 32 years), 69% were male, and 68% were treated for HCV infection. HCV treatment was not associated with an increase in recent injecting drug use (adjusted odds ratio (aOR) 1.06, 95% CI 0.93, 1.21) or recent used needle and syringe borrowing during follow-up (aOR 0.99, 95% CI 0.89, 1.08). HCV treatment was associated with a decrease in recent ancillary injecting equipment sharing during follow-up (aOR 0.85, 95% CI 0.74, 0.99). Further, among treated participants who remained in follow-up (n=24), ancillary injecting equipment sharing significantly decreased from 54% at enrolment to 17% during follow-up (P=0.012). CONCLUSIONS: HCV treatment was not associated with drug use or used needle and syringe borrowing during follow-up, but was associated with decreased ancillary injecting equipment sharing during follow-up. Programs to enhance HCV assessment and treatment among PWID should be expanded, given that HCV treatment does not lead to increases in injecting risk behaviours and has previously been demonstrated to be safe and effective among PWID.

Research reported in this publication was supported by the National Institute on Drug Abuse of the National Institutes of Health under award R01DA015999. Gregory Dore and Paul Haber were supported through a National Health and Medical Research Council Practitioner Research Fellowship. Jason Grebely was supportedthrough a National Health and Medical Research Council Career Development Award. MargaretHellard was supported through a National Health and Medical Research Council ResearchFellowship. John Kaldor was supported through a National Health and Medical ResearchCouncil Research Fellowship.)

Publication

  • Journal: The International Journal on Drug Policy
  • Published: 21/05/2015
  • Volume: 26
  • Issue: 10
  • Pagination: 976-983

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Health Issue

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